A Bold Image Creates a Powerful Presence

Unapologetic. That is the word that comes to mind as I ponder Women’s Equality Day 2022 and the women in business that inspire me. What is National Women's Equality day? We are celebrating our right to vote, granted in 1920 with the passage of the 19th Amendment. Tragically, Black Women citizens were not able to access that right until years later, and the struggle continues. To honor women's tenacity for equality, with a large serving of bold looks, I’m sharing two women in business that never apologize for their aspirations and autonomy. 

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Bozoma Saint John, Marketing Genius

Bozoma Saint John has blazed a unique path in marketing from PepsiCo, to Apple Music and as the first Black C-level executive at Netflix. She is fully tapped into her intuition, power, and fearlessness in her personal look and career. Bozoma recently posted that “there is no more sacred space than a Black Girl’s Hair Salon” calling her stylist “The High Priestess”. 

 

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Dolly Parton, Appalachian Singer/Songwriter

Dolly Parton left the insular culture of Appalachia to become one of the most successful singer-songwriters in history, spanning decades and crossing genres. Her song “I Will Always Love You” was penned as a goodbye to Porter Wagoner who wished to keep her relegated as a  “girl singer” on his very successful show. This bold move towards autonomy began her solo ascent to stardom. Dolly’s ginormous blonde hair, and take no prisoners femininity are completely tied to her persona.

The Power of Image

Both women have grown through the aid of their self-created images, projecting themselves into the world through personal style, embrace of strong hair looks, and their unapologetic “this is me” attitudes. Think about it… would Dolly be perceived as the icon she is today wearing a power suit? Would Bozoma have been able to bust that C-Suite open by trying to fit in and dress “like the guys”?

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Good Hair Day, Every Day

How do we, as women, tap into our own power, to inspire and project our best look? Many of us flow between touch-ups at home and visiting the salon. With the recent launch of The Hummingbird, a convenient at-home hair dye application is a sure path towards achieving the look we aspire to while blazing our own paths in the world.

Drippy Bottle Applicators

As a former salon “High Priestess”, Kathryn Madison the founder of Dye Candy, developed The Hummingbird to eliminate the challenges and damage caused by ordinary hair dye applicators. Mess-free hair dye application was Kathryn’s number one goal, as drippy dyes often color nearly as much on accident as on purpose, causing overprocessing. She wanted to DIY, minus the done-at-home look.

Autonomy of Beauty

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But Kathryn wanted far more than control over hair color. For her, this was a process of re-invention. Like many of us, a change in her look often preceded a change in her life. As a stay-at-home mom, lacking her usual salon access, she longed to stay connected to the transformational power of beauty and fashion. She needed a self-applying reusable hair dye applicator that would keep her hair jet black, platinum, or pink, with all the precision and skill she gave her clients. After years of trials, dozens of prototypes, and the help of many engineers, she succeeded with The Hummingbird’s launch on 02/02/2022.

Hair Color Power Tool

As women, we play with many accessories, but the one we wear every day is our hair. Whatever look we choose to present satisfies an essential need to state who we are to the world. The Hummingbird is a secret weapon, a friendly sidekick, and a hair color power tool that puts some sass in one step and a smile on our faces. Naysayers may disagree that a little Hummingbird can achieve so much. Kathryn unapologetically disagrees.


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There are many chapters from concept to the creation of a new product, solving the problems of applying hair color. In the final stages of design, home testers were given The Hummingbird to see if I had nailed it, or needed to go back to the drawing board.